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Quantum technologies

Dieter Meschede's research group
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"Quantum Futur-Award" to Dr. Carsten Robens

Dr. Carsten Robens wins the BMBF prize "Quantum Futur-Award" for the best PhD thesis in the research area of quantum technologies. With his PhD thesis, which was defended in February 2017, Carsten Robens has taken a step closer to realizing a quantum computer with neutral atoms. The core result of his work is a new method to control single atoms depending on the internal spin state, which enables an unparalleled control of the position of atoms in so-called polarization synthesized optical lattices. The ceremony has been celebrated at the Universität Stuttgart on March 22nd, 2018 in the framework of the "Quantum Futur-Akademie" (more details here).

 
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Rudolf Kaiser Prize 2017 awarded to Dr. Andrea Alberti

Dr. Andrea Alberti wins the Rudolf Kaiser Prize 2017. Since 1989, the prize is awarded every year by the Rudolf Kaiser Foundation to a young researcher that has distinguished herself/himself in the field of experimental physics. The benefactor, born in Nuremberg in 1923, has been for many years president of the Federal Patent Court in Germany before he obtained in 1979 the habilitation (Habilitation) at the TU München in the field of experimental physics. Since then, Rudolf Kaiser has devoted himself to the support of young researchers in the field of experimental physics.

This year the awarding ceremony will be celebrated on April 20th, 2018, as part of the “Physikalisches Kolloquium der Universität Bonn”. Colleagues and friends from the University of Bonn are cordially invited to the academic cerimony (download the program).

 
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Interview with Dieter Meschede about the future of quantum technologies

Quantum technologies are one of the booming research areas of the present days. Since a few years, it is not anymore just about fundamental research questions, but also, and especially, about tangible technological applications, which rely directly on quantum mechanical principles such as superposition states and entanglement. To know more, you can read the interview (in German) with Dieter Meschede speaking about the future of quantum technologies, with particular focus on tap-free communication.
 
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Intensive week: Introduction to topological insulators and their implementations in artificial matter setups

The intensive week consists of lectures introducing graduate students to the very active research field of topological insulators. Participants are required to have good knowledge of basic quantum mechanics and familiarity with basic concepts in condensed matter physics (Bloch theorem, energy bands, etc.). No prior knowledge of topology is assumed.

The main body of the intensive week is a course held by J. K. Asbóth, based on the lecture notes “A Short Course on Topological Insulators”, freely available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1509.02295. Through simple one- and two-dimensional model Hamiltonians, participants will acquire a good physical understanding of the core concepts of topological insulators. This is complemented by A. Alberti, presenting a selection of modern experiments demonstrating topological effects in ultracold atoms and nanophotonics setups. Additionally, guest speakers will give an introduction to “frontier” research topics in this field. The course will be accompanied by laboratory tours, exercise and interactive discussion sessions in the afternoon.

Read more...
 
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Atoms can be in two places at the same time

Can a penalty kick simultaneously score a goal and miss? For very small objects, at least, this is possible: according to the predictions of quantum mechanics, microscopic objects can take different paths at the same time. The world of macroscopic objects follows other rules: the football always moves in a definite direction. But is this always correct? Physicists of the University of Bonn have constructed an experiment designed to possibly falsify this thesis (view the scientific publication). Their first experiment shows that Caesium atoms can indeed take two paths at the same time. Read more...

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